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NTR 351: Nutrition and Health Communications: Pre-Library Session Assignment

Welcome!

Hi!  My name is Janice Hermer and I'm one of your Health Sciences Librarians at the ASU Downtown Phoenix Campus Library.  You can find my photo and contact info on the right side of this page.  

This assignment should take you 30 minutes or less. Completing this assignment and the short library quiz at the end will prepare you for excellence in your NTR 351 projects.

Follow the steps below, then complete the short quiz.

 

Step 1: Get to know your ASU Library

Step 2: ASU Library doesn't have it?  We can get it for you!

Step 3: Set up your ILLIAD Account to use the Interlibrary Loan / Document Delivery service

Step 4: Become an ASU Library online resources Power User!

Step 5: Learn strategies to find scholarly research studies mentioned in health news

  1. What to look for in a health news article
  2. Use the news article information to search for the scholarly research source and get the full text

Step 6: Quiz

Comments and Suggestions

Step 1: Get to know your ASU Library

ASU Library is here to support you in your research and studying success!

Watch this 1 minute 'Library Minute' video for an overview of ASU Library resources, services, and locations:

http://youtu.be/ZpzDwCp7yo4

 

Look for:

  1. How many library locations are available?
  2. How can you get to the online library at ASU?
  3. Can you request materials to come to any location?
  4. What are 'Library Guides?'
  5. What service can connect you to research assistance anytime?

Step 2: ASU Library doesn't have it? We can get it for you! (For free!)

Join Anali for a 'Library Minute' on the ASU Library Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery service

http://youtu.be/1nKw6nnlyJA

 

Look for:

  1. How quickly will you usually receive a scanned PDF of an article that you request via Interlibrary Loan?

Step 3: Set up your Illiad Account to use the Interlibrary Loan / Document Delivery service

1. Start at the ASU Library home page, lib.asu.edu

2. Click on 'My Accounts' on the gray information bar across the page and select 'My Illiad Account.'

3. On the ILLIAD Account page, click on the red text, 'First time users.'

4. Follow the steps to create your ILLIAD Account.

5. Problems creating your account?  Contact the Interlibrary Loan office at: (480) 965-3282 or via email: ill@asu.edu 

Step 4: Become an ASU Library online resources Power User!

Join Anali for a 'Library Minute' on Online Access

http://youtu.be/K7wjBC5hhL4

 

Look for:

  1. What's the Library Toolbar?  How can it make you an online resources 'Power User'?

Step 5 - Part 1: What to look for in a health news article

Exercise regimens, fad diets, and nutritonal advice are popular topics in news stories. Sometimes these stories take their lead from scholarly research studies.  As Nutrition students, you can find, read, and evaluate these source studies and fact check the news stories.

When reading a news story that mentions a 'study' or 'research,' look for the following:

  • Study author name/s
  • Topic of original study or article
  • Where it was published (journal name or government report name)
  • Year or date the study was published
  • The institution where the study was conducted and/or where the author is from
  • A direct link!  
    • (Sometimes it's just that easy - although you still may need to use library resources to get free full text of a scholarly research study.)

Example:

 

Pomegranates and their health benefits are a popular topic.  Let's say a friend sends you a link to this a news story:

"Research: Pomegranate May Reverse Blocked Arteries"

http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/can-pomegranate-keep-you-going-under-knife 

 

This news story references a study from the journal Clinical Nutrition and links to a posting of the study's abstract (summary).

Although we still don't have the full text, there are a couple quick ways to get to it:

The abstract posting gives the 'PMID' - this is the unique reference number for this research study in the open access research database, PubMed.

With the PMID - we can find this study and get to its full text using the PubMed research database.

1) Did you catch the tip to be a 'Power User' in the Step 4 video on Online Access?  If you did, and you set up your Library Toolbar, you can:

  • Click on the PMID link in the image above, or on the posted abstract from the news story site.  This will take you to the study's abstract in PubMed.  Since PubMed is an open access database, anyone can use it to identify research, but the full text of a study (like this one) may not be available for free.
  • As an ASU student, you can check for full text via ASU Library's online resources
  • With the library tool bar, click on the icon

  • Click on 'proxies,' then
  • Click on 'reload page with this proxy' to use the ASU EZproxy 
  • Click Get it @ ASU to see full text options 

  • Look for a 'Get Article' option

  • This will take you to full text of the study

 

2) Not interested in the toolbar?  You can still get to full text using PubMed!

  • Copy the PMID number: 15158307
  • from the ASU Library website, https://lib.asu.edu scroll down to Frequently Used Resources
  • Click on PubMed
  • Paste the PMID number into the search bar
  • You'll get to the study's page in PubMed
  • Click Get it @ ASU to see full text options 
  • Look for a 'Get Article' option
  • This will take you to full text of the study

Step 5 - Part 2: Use the news article information to search for the scholarly resarch source and get the full text

To check the information in a health news article, or to learn more about it, as Nutrition students, you can find the full text of the scholarly research study mentioned.

In Step 4 - Part 1 you saw how to get to full text of a study - when the PMID (PubMed Identifier) is referenced.

However, sometimes you might need to do a little more searching.

 

Example 2:

Take a look at this article from the Atlantic:

"Study: Caffeine Can Improve Memory"

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2014/01/study-caffeine-can-improve-memory/283016/ 

It has a direct link to an article in Nature Neuroscience

http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/vaop/ncurrent/abs/nn.3623.html

For full text:

1) From the article page on the Nature Neuroscience website, try out the Library Toolbar option - once you reload the page, you can click on the 'PDF' or 'Full Text' links and get full text immediately!

2) Copy the research article title, "Post-study caffeine administration enhances memory consolidation in humans," and use one of the 4 methods shown below to get to full text.

 

Example 3

Take a look at this news story from the Daily Mail, "The apple doesn't fall far from the tree: Study reveals parents' poor eating habits are to blame for childhood obesity, NOT fast food"

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2540248/Study-reveals-parents-poor-eating-habits-blame-childhood-obesity-NOT-fast-food.html

In the story, it references a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and links to this scientific news site that also discusses the research study in an article titled, "Fast Food Not the Major Cause of Rising Childhood Obesity Rates, Study Finds."

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140115132750.htm

The Science Daily site gives a reference for the research study at the end of its news article:

Journal Reference:

  1. J. M. Poti, K. J. Duffey, B. M. Popkin. The association of fast food consumption with poor dietary outcomes and obesity among children: is it the fast food or the remainder of the diet? American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2013; 99 (1): 162 DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.113.071928

 

Try out one or more of the 4 methods below to get to the full text of the full research study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

 

4 methods to get to full text

  • At least one of these should work for any article citation

The 4 methods below use this APA style article citation:

Pattyn, E., Mahieu, N., Selfe, J., Verdonk, P., Steyaert, A., & Witvrouw, E. (2012). What predicts functional outcome after treatment for patellofemoral pain?Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, 44(10), 1827-1833. doi:10.1249/MSS.0b013e31825d56e3 

 

Tip: If a citation shows a 'doi' (digital object identifier) - try this first to find the full text!  A doi is a unique number assigned to identify 1 specific document.  You can see an example at the end of the citation above:

10.1249/MSS.0b013e31825d56e3

 

Method 1:

Search for the article title using Library One Search - this is the search box you'll see on your MyASU page when you click the book stack Library link, and the search box you'll see on the ASU Library home page: https://lib.asu.edu

  • Look at the citation for the article you need to find.  Copy and paste the doi (10.1249/MSS.0b013e31825d56e3) or the article title, "What predicts functional outcome after treatment for patellofemoral pain?," into the Library One Search box, then click 'Search Library.'  
  • When you see the article title listed in your Library One Search results,
  • Click on the title for full text options.

 

 

If you see no full text, look for an Option linking you to "Interlibrary Loan," then sign in and use your Illiad account to request the full text of the article.

 

Method 2:

Search for the article title using Google Scholar - there is a tab for Google Scholar on the search box you'll see on your MyASU page when you click the book stack Library link, and the search box you'll see on the ASU Library home page: https://lib.asu.edu

  • Click on the Google Scholar tab
  • Copy and paste the doi (10.1249/MSS.0b013e31825d56e3) or the article title, "What predicts functional outcome after treatment for patellofemoral pain?," into the Google Scholar Search box, then click 'Search.'  
  • When you see the article title listed in your Google Scholar search results,
  • Click on the 'Get it @ ASU' link for full text options.

 

 

Method 3

Search for the article title using PubMed (an open access research database for health research) - there is a link for "All Research Databases" underneath the search box you'll see on your MyASU page when you click the book stack Library link, and in the gray bar across the ASU Library home page: https://lib.asu.edu

  • Click on the Research Databases link
  • Click on the quick link to the PubMed Research Database 
  • Click on PubMed by the 'connect' arrow - to get into PubMed to search
  • Copy and paste the doi (10.1249/MSS.0b013e31825d56e3) or the article title, "What predicts functional outcome after treatment for patellofemoral pain?," into the PubMed Search box, then click 'Search.'  When you see the article title listed in your PubMed search results,
  • Click on the 'Get it @ ASU' link for full text options.

 

 

Method 4:

Use the ASU Library 'Journals' search to find the article - there is a tab for Journals on the search box you'll see on your MyASU page when you click the book stack Library link, and the search box you'll see on the ASU Library home page: https://lib.asu.edu

  • Click on the Journals tab
  • Look at your citation and identify the title of the journal in which the article was published.  In our example from above, the journal title is, "Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise"
  • Copy and paste the journal title, "Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise," into the Electronic (online) Journals Search box, then click 'Find Journal.'  
  • The next page will show
    • Whether ASU Library subscribes to this journal online
    • The date range of ASU Library's subscription and
    • Links for online access to this journal
  • Check the date of your article (ex: 2012).  If access is available for that date, click on the appropriate link to get to the journal page
  • On the journal page, use the 'search this journal' or 'search this title' to search for the title of the article you need, or browse to the appropriate year, volume, issue, and page number to get to the article
  • Look for a PDF or HTML full text version of the article by its title

 

Last step!

Awesome!  You have completed this pre-library session assignment!

All that's left is to take your (short!) library quiz below - if you went through the steps above, you should ace it with ease! 

Comments or suggestions on this assignment?  Use the Feedback box below (the email address is optional - feel free to leave that blank for anonymous comments).  

Thanks!

Quiz

Your Librarian

Janice Hermer's picture
Janice Hermer
Contact:
411 N Central Ave, Downtown campus Library
602-496-0683

Subject Guide

Kevin Pardon's picture
Kevin Pardon
Contact:
411 N. Central Ave., Downtown Phoenix campus Library
602-496-0487

Hours and Locations