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Biblical Studies

The Bible Text Online

Parallel Text

The Bible - Internet Sacred Text Archive: Parallel versions of King James, The Hebrew Bible (Tanakh), the Apocrypha, the Vulgate, the Septuagint, Greek New Testament, and the Polyglot King James Version (linked to the Strong's Hebrew and Greek Lexicon entries).

Open Bible: Textual and visual tools such as cross references (digital humanities)

Die Website fur Bibelstudium (German interface): Critical editions of the bible, including BHS (Hebrew Bible according to the Leningrad Codex); the Septuagint; Luther Bible, and more.


English Translations

New Revised Standard Version: The most widely used accepted version by most Christian denominations.  The online version here omits the Apocrypha (books accepted in the Catholic Canon).

The New American Bible: Offered by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

NETS, New English Translation of the Septuagint:  A modern translation of the ancient Greek Old Testament books.  Set the standard for later Old Testament versions.   

The Hebrew Bible

Tanakh: Different view options as well as other praimary Judaic texts; Israeli educational foundations.  

Tanakh - Jewish Bible in Hebrew: Mechon Mamre, Jerusalem.

Tanakh with Rashi Commentary (Hebrew/English): Click the Show Rashi's Commentary box on the upper right to activate; Chabad.

JPS Hebrew Bible in English (1917): Mechon Mamre, Jerusalem.

JPS Tagged Tanakh: "A collaborative platform spearheaded by the Jewish Publication Society, that joins vetted content and user-generated commentary around the Jewish Bible."

 

Databases

Databases

Institute for the Study of the Ancient World: ISAW is a center for advanced scholarly research and graduate education, which aims to encourage particularly the study of the economic, religious, political and cultural connections between ancient civilizations.

Travelers in the Middle East Archive: Western interactions with the Middle East, particularly travels to Egypt during the 19th-early 20th centuries. Includes travel guides, museum catalogs, and travel narratives, as well as photos and maps.

Prosopography of the Babylonian Magic Bowls: Jewish and Non-Jewish personal names found on Babylonian incantation bowls, that are dated to the 5th-8th centuries CE. The database was compiled as part of a British-Israeli research project (BIRAX), and is located on the University of Southampton website.

Manuscripts

Hours and Locations