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Witchcraft - History & Culture

Dealing with the history of witchcraft and its place in our culture; covering primarily Europe and the Americas

Citing Sources

Citing Web Sites

It is important to provide complete information about your primary or secondary source whether found in a printed source or online. The basic elements to include in a citation for a published print source are: author of the document, title of the document, title of the book if different from the document, name of editor or author of the book, place of publication, publisher, year, and page numbers. The basic elements to include in a citation for an online source are: author of the document, title of the document, title of the web site, author or producer of the web site, url, date (if given) and date accessed. Various style formats such as Chicago, MLA and APA put these elements in different order using different conventions. See the following web sites for further information and examples.

ALSO:

Citation Style Manuals Library Guide - ASU Library
This page that links to many of the most popular citation style formats

Assembling a List of Works Cited in Your Paper - Duke University Libraries
Includes examples for both the major formats of citable materials and the respective style manual citations.

For an automated service to help format your citations, try: Son of Citation Machine from the Landmark Project. It is very easy to use and accurate

Citing Primary Sources ( From Library of Congress).  Also from the Library of Congress: Citing Primary Sources: MLA 

Citing Records in the National Archives of the United States:  Citing Records in the National Archives of the United States: General Information Leaflet, Number 17Introduction; Elements of Citations to Records of Federal Agencies; Guidelines for Citing Textual Records; Guidelines for Citing Microform Records; Guidelines for Citing Nontextual Records; Guidelines for Citing Electronic Records; Guidelines for Citing Records in Affiliated Archives; A Note on Citing Digitized Documents Available at NARA's World Wide Web Site

Academic Integrity and Plagarism

Academic integrity, student cheating and plagiarism are concerns of the utmost importance to university faculty, administrators, writing center and tutoring staff, librarians and academic advisors. The short, straightforward definitions of academic integrity and plagarism are meant to assist persons interested inunderstanding  more about these issues.

Academic Integrity:
Most sources define academic integrity (or academic honesty) as the foundation for academic life.  It is the manner in which you behave in an academic environment when you do research, writing a paper or creating a project. The fundamental five values in this academic process  are honesty, trust, respect, fairness and responsibility. Academic intgrity is the commitment to live by these values. Plagiarism is an aspect of academic integrity in that using another's ideas, words, theories, illustrations or graphics, opinions or facts without giving credit is dishonest.

 

Plagiarism:
To use, steal or represent the ideas, words or products of another as your own ideas, words or products. Use of someone else's ideas, words or products without giving credit to the author or originator is considered plagiarism.

When using or quoting word for word the words of another person it must be acknowledged.  Summarizing or paraphrasing the words or ideas of another without giving that person credit is also plagiarism.

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