Skip to Main Content
Login to LibApps


Constitution Day

About Constitution Day

To encourage all Americans to learn more about the Constitution, Congress in 1956 established Constitution Week, to begin each year on September 17th, the date in 1787 when delegates to the Convention signed the Constitution. In 2004, Senator Robert C. Byrd of West Virginia included key provisions in the Consolidated Appropriations Act of Fiscal Year 2005 designating September 17th of each year as Constitution Day and requiring public schools and governmental offices to provide educational programs to promote a better understanding of the Constitution.

Constitution Day activities at ASU since 2006 are listed below. From 2006 to 2017, the ASU Library hosted various Constitution Day events.

Starting in 2017, the School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership https://scetl.asu.edu/ has hosted an Annual Constitution Day Lecture. https://scetl.asu.edu/annual-constitution-day-lecture

See the ASU News articles, "ASU professor discuss the history, importance of Constitution Day," and "5 things to know about the Constitution."

Constitution Day 2022

2022 Annual Constitution Day Lecture: "1776 and Us: Finding the Founding in a Foundering Democracy" with Dr. Jane Kamensky

 

The School of Civic and Economic Thought and Leadership's 2022 Annual Constitution Day Lecture is "1776 and Us: Finding the Founding in a Foundering Democracy" with Dr. Jane Kamensky

From the very beginning, the history and study of the American Revolution has been bound up with the national identity of the United States, and thus with the country’s present needs. In recent years, the competing imperatives of activists and journalists at both edges of our ideological spectrum have produced warring narratives of the American founding: slavery versus liberty, original sin versus germinal gift, conclave of villains versus garden of heroes. Both of these approaches owe more to politics than to history. As we approach the quarter-millennium mark, how can we equip ourselves and our students with an understanding of the revolutionary era that is rigorous, complex, and above all, true to the evidence?

Light refreshments will be served. 

Jane Kamensky earned her BA (1985) and PhD (1993) in history from Yale University. She is Jonathan Trumbull Professor of American History at Harvard University and Pforzheimer Foundation Director of the Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America at Harvard Radcliffe Institute. A historian of British America and the United States, she is the author of numerous books, including A Revolution in Color: The World of John Singleton Copley (2016), which won four major prizes and was a finalist for several others. A former Commissioner of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery, she serves as a Trustee of the Museum of the American Revolution, and as one of the principal investigators on the NEH/ Department of Education-funded initiative, Educating for American Democracy.  

Date: Monday, September 19, 2022
Time: 5:00 to 7:00 pm
Location: Ventana BC, Memorial Union 241, 301 E Orange St., Tempe, AZ 85281 

Past ASU Constitution Day Events

The ASU Library acknowledges the twenty-three Native Nations that have inhabited this land for centuries. Arizona State University's four campuses are located in the Salt River Valley on ancestral territories of Indigenous peoples, including the Akimel O’odham (Pima) and Pee Posh (Maricopa) Indian Communities, whose care and keeping of these lands allows us to be here today. ASU Library acknowledges the sovereignty of these nations and seeks to foster an environment of success and possibility for Native American students and patrons. We are advocates for the incorporation of Indigenous knowledge systems and research methodologies within contemporary library practice. ASU Library welcomes members of the Akimel O’odham and Pee Posh, and all Native nations to the Library.