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Environmental Engineering

Guide to library and internet resources for environmental engineering

Introduction

This page contains four sections: 

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Components of a Citation

When presenting or referring to the work of others, whether as a direct quote or by paraphrasing, you must provide the appropriate attribution.  By citing the specific document, medium, or other form of communication, you indicate who originally made the contribution AND you allow your reader to find that contribution from which s/he may make their own judgment.  Failure to provide appropriate attribution is considered plagiarism.

Citations need to be both consistent, so the reader can recognize what the item is (book, journal article, film, government document, etc.), and complete, so that s/he can find it. 

Citations should always include these five elements : 

  • Author
    The person, persons or group (corporation, government agency, institution, etc.) that is responsible for the content of the work. 
     
  • Title
    What the work is called. 
     
  • Date of Publication
    When the work was made available; depending on the physical format of the material, this could be listed as:
    • year,
    • month and year, or
    • day, month and year. 
       
  • Source
    Where the work comes from.  For books, this would be the publisher; for journal articles, this would be the title of the journal, for government documents, the agency name, for technical reports, the corporation or agency, etc.
     
  • Location
    Any information that's needed to find the work within/from the source; this varies with format.  For books the location would the city of the publisher; for journal articles it would be the volume, issue and pages; for items only published online this could be an URL or a DOI (digital object identifier).

How these elements are ordered in the citation and what punctuation, spacing, and font style (italics, bold) are used depends on the citation style you are asked to use. 

Citation Style Guides

If your instructor does not specify, consider using one of these styles: 

 

Other Journal Publisher Style Guides and Manuals 

Each journal will usually have a section on its website labeled "Guide for Authors," "Information for Authors," or "Submitting an article."  This is were you can usually find what citation style the journal uses and see examples of at least a book or journal article reference.  Some journals no longer make this information available but instead, refer the potential author to their preferred citation management software (ex., RefWorks, EndNote, Mendeley, Zotero, etc.) where their journal template is available. 

Examples

The following citations use the APA (American Psychological Association) style to show the components: 

  1. Shepherd, R., Frost, J. D. (1995). Failures in civil engineering: Structural, foundation, and geoenvironmental case studies. New York: American Society of Civil Engineers

    ​This citation is for a book and contains the following information: 
    • Authors: R. Shepherd and J.D. Frost
    • Title: Failures in civil engineering: structural, foundation, and geoenvironmental case studies
    • Date of Publication: 1995
    • Source: American Society of Civil Engineers 
    • Location: New York
       
  2. Plaut, R. H. (2008). Snap Loads and Torsional Oscillations of the Original Tacoma Narrows Bridge. Journal of Sound and Vibration, 309(3), 613-636. doi: 10.1016/j.jsv.2007.07.057 

    ​This citation is for a journal article and contains the following information: 
    • Author: R.H. Plaut
    • Title: Snap loads and torsional oscillations of the original Tacoma Narrows Bridge
    • Date of Publication: 2008
    • Source: Journal of Sound and Vibration 
    • Location: Volume 309, issue 3, pages 613 to 636;  doi: 10.1016/j.jsv.2007.07.057 

 

The following are the same two examples from above but this time cited in IEEE Style.  Still the same information but note the differences in the order of the components, the punctuation used in between components and in some cases the different way the component is written. 

  1. R. Shepherd and J. D. Frost,  Failures in civil engineering: Structural, foundation, and geoenvironmental case studies.  New York, NY, USA: American Society of Civil Engineers, 1995.
     
  2. R. H. Plaut, "Snap Loads and Torsional Oscillations of the Original Tacoma Narrows Bridge." J. Sound Vib., vol. 309, no. 3, pp. 613-636, Mar. 2008.  

RefWorks: An Easy Way to Organize and Manage Your Citations

Citation management software helps you not only keep track of references but also helps you format the references into different citations styles.  At ASU you are provided with RefWorks (http://www.asu.edu/refworks); there is no charge for this service and you can have as many RefWorks accounts as you like.  You can even have an account for a team and share the account name/password among the team members.    

So when you are assigned a project that requires an extensive literature review - remember that RefWorks is available - it's a great time saver. 



Want to know more about what RefWorks can do for you? 

RefWorks provides a complete set of 30 tutorials running for slightly over two hours.  There's no need to view all the tutorials, we recommend the following to get you started:

1.0 Introduction (47s)

1.1 Accessing RefWorks, Creating an Account and Logging In (2m 53s)
To access the ASU version of RefWorks, go to http://www.asu.edu/refworks or go to the Libraries home page at http://lib.asu.edu scroll down to "Most Used Resources" and click on the "RefWorks"

1.2 Adding References Using Direct Export (2m 14s)

1.3 Organizing Imported References into Folders (2m 7s)

1.5 Creating a Bibliography (1m 53s)

2.2 Adding References by Importing Text Files (2m 9s)

2.3 Adding References by Manual Entry (1m 55s)

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