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Social Justice and Human Rights

This guide is designed to support students in the Social Justice and Human Rights Master's Degree program. It includes resources for research both local and global issues.

Selected Immigration Organizations

  • ACLU of Arizona
    Founded in 1959, the ACLU of Arizona was formed by a small group of civil libertarians who wanted an institution that would defend liberty in the state. They believed that the preservation of liberty required a vigilant defense of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights. Today, the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation of Arizona is responsible for public education programs and litigation in defense of civil liberties.
  • ACLU-NM Regional Center for Border Rights
    The ACLU–NM Regional Center for Border Rights (RCBR) addresses civil and human rights violations that stem from border-related immigration policies. The center works in conjunction with ACLU affiliates in California, Arizona and Texas and immigrant rights advocates throughout the border region
  • American Friends Service Committee
    The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) is a Quaker organization that includes people of various faiths who are committed to social justice, peace and humanitarian service. Our work is based on the principles of the Religious Society of Friends, the belief in the worth of every person, and faith in the power of love to overcome violence and injustice.
  • American Friends Service Committee
    The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) is a Quaker organization that includes people of various faiths who are committed to social justice, peace and humanitarian service. Their work is based on the principles of the Religious Society of Friends, the belief in the worth of every person, and faith in the power of love to overcome violence and injustice.
  • Angeles Del Desierto
    Angeles del Desierto is a volunteer group that does search and rescue operations in the desert and mounaneous regions of the border between the United States and Mexico. They aid search and rescue events, provide food, water, clothing and first aid emergency aid to people found in these extreme conditions until they can be taken to a place where they can further assistance.
  • Border Action Network
    Border Action Network formed in 1999 and works with immigrant and border communities in Arizona to ensure that our rights are respected, our human dignity upheld and that our communities are healthy places to live.
  • BorderLinks
    BorderLinks is a bi-national, nonprofit educational organization at the U.S./Mexico border dedicated to raising awareness and inspiring action around global political economics. Its programs focus on cross-border relationship building opportunities, issues of immigration, community formation and development, and social justice in the borderlands between Mexico, the U.S., and beyond.
  • Florence Project
    The Florence Project provides and coordinates free legal services and related social services to indigent men, women, and unaccompanied children detained in Arizona for immigration removal proceedings.
  • Frontera de Christo
    Frontera de Cristo is one of the six Presbyterian Border Ministries of the National Presbyterian Church of Mexico and the Presbyterian Church U.S.A. Frontera de Cristo is centered in Agua Prieta, Sonora and Douglas, Arizona.
  • Immigrant Defense Project
    The Immigrant Defense Project (IDP), formerly an initiative of the New York State Defenders Association, defends the legal, constitutional and human rights of immigrants facing criminal or deportation charges.
  • Immigrant Legal Resource Center
    The Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC) is a national non-profit resource center that provides legal trainings, educational materials, and advocacy to advance immigrant rights.
  • Interfaith Immigration Coalition (IIC)
    The IIC is a partnership of faith-based organizations committed to enacting fair and human immigration reform.
  • Kino Border Initiative (KBI)
    The Kino Border Initiative "is an innovative and cooperative effort between six major religious organizations that strive to accompany migrants and communities affected by the consequences of migration. The KBI is strategically located in the twin cities of Ambos Nogales
  • Mexican American Legal Defense & Educational Fund (MALDEF)
    ounded in 1968, MALDEF is a national Latino legal civil rights organization. MALDEF promotes social change through advocacy, communications, community education, and litigation in the areas of education, employment, immigrant rights, and political access.
  • Migrant Resource Center & Shelter
    The Migrant Resource Center & Shelter is a binational humanitarian project dedicated to providing critical aid to migrants as they are repatriated by the U.S. border patrol near the Naco port of entry. Since its inception in 2008, we have helped over 29,000 people through our Resource Center & Shelter.
  • National Immigration Law Center (NILC)
    Founded in 1979, the National Immigration Law Center has been dedicated to defending and advancing the rights of low-income immigrants and their family members.
  • No More Deaths
    In 2004, No More Deaths began as an interfaith coalition between many groups and organizations providing different kinds of assistance to migrants. Today, No More Deaths is a ministry of the Unitarian Universalist Church of Tucson.
  • Tohono O'odham Nation
    The Tohono O'odham Nation is a federally-recognized tribe that includes approximately 28,000 members occupying tribal lands in Southwestern Arizona. The Nation is the second largest reservations in Arizona in both population and geographical size, with a land base of 2.8 million acres and 4,460 square miles, approx. the size of the State of Connecticut. Its four non-contiguous segments total more than 2.8 million acres at an elevation of 2,674 feet. There are also O'odham who live in Mexico.
  • U.S.-Mexico Border and Immigration Task Force  
      
    The U.S.-Mexico Border and Immigration Task Force formed in November 2006 to present a new “border vision” that integrates comprehensibly border security, human rights and civil rights, accountability, community security and regional integration. The Task Force brings together the opinions, expertise and insight of diverse sectors from U.S.-Mexico border communities to present policy recommendations and testimonies on the current immigration reform and border policy debate.
    Content from this page was selected from the UCLA Law LibGuide.

Hours and Locations